Are 99.9% of Your Photographs Just Not Important Enough To Save?

Are 99.9% of Your Photographs Just Not Important Enough To Save?

If this was your entire photo collection sitting in this trash can in the photo above, would this make you actually feel relief … or utter panic?

What if I added to this scenario. What if to the best of your knowledge, all of your photos sitting in the trash were already scanned and safely backed up on a couple of your hard drives.

Do you now feel relieved … or still utterly panicked?

From everyone I have talked to about this scenario, it seems safe for me to say that I believe the world is in somewhat of a divide whether it’s actually okay to throw away your prints and slides once they have been scanned and digitally preserved.

And for some, hopefully not too many, I am sure they would say it’s okay to throw away many if not most photos before they were scanned and preserved.

Yes. You heard me.

Behold! The New SYEL Design and Why I Changed It

Behold! The New SYEL Design and Why I Changed It

As you can probably see, I made some big changes to the look and feel of the site this weekend.

I didn’t hate the old design, in fact, I am still quite proud of it. It was really the first website I have ever done all of the design work (CSS “coding” & layout) myself from top to bottom.

It was a labor of love — and one that I spent way too much time tweaking!

I learned a ton in the process. So, even though I probably should have spent more of my time writing posts for the website, I can’t say I regret any of it.

But, it’s been a couple years now, and we are all accessing the internet in new and different ways. We aren’t always surfing on a nice big laptop or desktop screen anymore. Now it’s smart phones and tablets, and my website always needs to grow and adapt to the ways in which you would like to access it.

Best Photo Slide Box to Safely Archive Your Slides — Logan Slide File Review (Video)

Best Photo Slide Box to Safely Archive Your Slides — Logan Slide File Review (Video)

If you’re looking for something to store all of your 35-millimeter slides in, you should consider checking out the slide file made by a company called Logan.

It’s a very nice all-metal box with a hinged lid, two metal clasps to keep it shut and a little handle to carry it by.

I bought three of these because I actually couldn’t find what I thought I was looking for, which were these small, little cardboard boxes that hold maybe 70 or so slides that my dad had been using for many, many years to keep his entire slide collection in.

The Logan Slide File is about US$29.95 a piece. When I bought mine they were $26.95 so they’re not cheap. But almost anything slide-related seems to carry a premium right now in the digital era. But from every slide container I found, this seemed to be the best.

I was very happy to read that this slide file box has been made for about 40 years now and for those who like buying US products, you will be happy to know that they’re all made here in the United States in the City of Bartlett, Illinois.

My Inspiring Photo Scanning Progress Report for May 2012

My Inspiring Photo Scanning Progress Report for May 2012

Welcome to my fourth monthly progress report covering the month of May 2012!

Last month was a fun month for me. Not only was I this close (holding two fingers close together) to completing a personal goal of mine to scan every day of an entire month, but I also received a package from my Aunt Karen with a bunch of amazing old photos of her and my Dad when they were kids that I had never seen before!

This month, was… not so fun.

For me, this month was insane! So read on, I’ll tell you all about it.

Every month, I am posting a detailed report — just like this one — sharing with you how far I have come with my goal to scan and restore my entire 10,000+ family photo collection.

By doing so, I hope to inspire you to do the same!

Itoya Art Profolio Marker — Photo Safe Archival Pen Review

Itoya Art Profolio Marker — Photo Safe Archival Pen Review

When I first started scanning my photo collection, I starting out writing on the back of my prints with a fairly dull pencil. However, I pushed down extremely lightly though as to not etch through to the other side!

But, you know, I just really hate using pencils now.

I’m an adult now. I already had my fair share of NFL pencil sets in the 1980’s. I feel like I have moved past pencils in my life.

What I really wanted was a decent ink pen that I could feel safe using on photos and slides. And if I had to make a list of the qualities I was looking for in particular, it would look something like this:

My Dream Photo Pen Criteria:

Photo safe, Non-toxic, Permanent ink, Fade resistant, Dries quickly, Will not smear once dry, and Won’t bleed through.

Did this one pass the test?

If You Don’t Add This to the Filename of Your Scanned Photos, You’ll Probably Hate Yourself Later

If You Don’t Add This to the Filename of Your Scanned Photos, You’ll Probably Hate Yourself Later

Whether you keep all of your scanned master (original) image files in folders on a hard drive, or you allow an image manager like Picasa, iPhoto or Aperture to manage them inside a library file, you will still be required to give each photo a filename.

It could be as simple and non-descriptive as “photo-1.jpg” or maybe even simple yet somewhat descriptive like “mom at the beach 1984.tif”.

But, it’s actually a very important part of the process of scanning photos, that if done with a little bit of forethought, can save you a lot of time and headache later.